Injured Animals Keep Moving with Prosthetics



Naki'o, a mixed-breed dog with four prosthetic devices, goes for a run in Colorado Springs April 12, 2013. Naki'o lost all four feet to frostbite when he was abandoned as a puppy in a foreclosed home. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




A Yorkshire Terrier named Hope shows off her uni-wheel attached to a doggie vest in Longmont, Colorado April 21, 2013. Hope is missing one limb and is able to walk with the wheel attachment. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




A keeper holds an artificial tail fluke attached to female bottlenose dolphin “Fuji”, estimated to be 37-years-old, at Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Motobu town on the southern Japanese island of Okinawa February 14, 2007. Fuji lost 75 percent of her tail fluke due to an unknown disease in 2002. The dolphin can swim and jump using the artificial tail fluke, which is believed to be the world's first artificial fin for a dolphin, and was developed by veterinarians and Japan's largest tire maker Bridgestone Co., an aquarium official said. (Photo by Issei Kato/Reuters)



Martin Kaufmann, owner and founder of OrthoPets, looks over a former stray dog named Snow who had to have a right foot amputated to prepare for her artificial leg and foot in Denver February 20, 2013. OrthoPets creates prosthetics for animals. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)



Hoppa, a four-year-old mixed breed dog born without front legs, uses a prosthetic device to walk outside in the central Israeli city of Tel Aviv February 28, 2010. The device was invented especially for Hoppa by a animal-loving art student, who hopes his wheeling device will improve the lives of pets born with abnormalities or with amputated limbs. (Photo by Amir Cohen/Reuters)





A 48-year-old female elephant named Motala walks on her newly attached prosthetic leg at the Elephant Hospital in Lampang province, north of Bangkok August 16, 2009. Motala's front left leg was maimed after she stepped on a landmine at the Myanmar-Thai border 10 years ago. (Photo by Phichaiyong Mayerku/Reuters)




Tzvika, an injured female turtle, walks with the aid of her newly attached wheels at the Wildlife Hospital in the Ramat Gan Safari near Tel Aviv January 5, 2011. About two months ago, Tzvika was run over by a lawn mower and suffered severe damage to her shell, and a spinal injury that affected her ability to use her rear limbs. The wheels, attached by veterinarians at the safari, elevate the turtle to keep the shell from being worn down and enable her to walk. (Photo by Nir Elias/Reuters)

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