Seda Monastery



This photo taken on April 4, 2013 shows an elderly Buddhist nun carrying her dog in Seda Monastery, the largest Tibetan Buddhist school in the world, with up to 40,000 monks and nuns in residence for some parts of the year. Seda, known to Tibetans as Serthar is located in Ganzi prefecture in the west of China's Sichuan province and has become a hotbed of protests and violence since the Tibetan uprisings of March 2008. More than 110 Tibetans have set themselves alight since 2009, with most dying of their injuries, in demonstrations against what they view as Chinese oppression which Beijing rejects pointing to substantial investment in Tibet and other regions with large Tibetan populations, although critics say economic development has brought an influx of ethnic Han Chinese and eroded traditional Tibetan culture. (Photo by Peter Parks/AFP Photo)




This photo taken on April 5, 2013 shows Buddhist monks passing a yak in Seda Monastery, the largest Tibetan Buddhist school in the world, with up to 40,000 monks and nuns in residence for some parts of the year. (Photo by Peter Parks/AFP Photo)




This photo taken on April 4, 2013 shows apprentice Buddhist monks and nuns collecting water in Seda Monastery, the largest Tibetan Buddhist school in the world, with up to 40,000 monks and nuns in residence for some parts of the year. (Photo by Peter Parks/AFP Photo)




This photo taken on April 5, 2013 shows hundreds of small houses where monks and nuns live at Seda Monastery, the largest Tibetan Buddhist school in the world, with up to 40,000 monks and nuns in residence for some parts of the year. (Photo by Peter Parks/AFP Photo)




This photo taken on April 4, 2013 shows apprentice Buddhist monks leaving their shoes outside before a debating session in Seda Monastery, the largest Tibetan Buddhist school in the world, with up to 40,000 monks and nuns in residence for some parts of the year. (Photo by Peter Parks/AFP Photo)




This photo taken on April 5, 2013 shows hundreds of small houses where monks and nuns live at Seda Monastery, the largest Tibetan Buddhist school in the world, with up to 40,000 monks and nuns in residence for some parts of the year. (Photo by Peter Parks/AFP Photo)




This photo taken on April 5, 2013 shows Buddhist monks walking in front of the thousands of small houses where they live at Seda Monastery, the largest Tibetan Buddhist school in the world, with up to 40,000 monks and nuns in residence for some parts of the year. (Photo by Peter Parks/AFP Photo)




This photo taken on April 4, 2013 shows Buddhist nuns and monks walking through Seda Monastery, the largest Tibetan Buddhist school in the world, with up to 40,000 monks and nuns in residence for some parts of the year. (Photo by Peter Parks/AFP Photo)

Art Toast Project By Ida Skivenes



Many parents know the stubborn reluctance of children to start breakfast, and adults themselves sometimes miss the morning meal. But the situation would look very different if they had the opportunity every day to enjoy the mouth-watering pictures on the plates, which are of conventional products creates by Ida Skivenes.










Injured Animals Keep Moving with Prosthetics



Naki'o, a mixed-breed dog with four prosthetic devices, goes for a run in Colorado Springs April 12, 2013. Naki'o lost all four feet to frostbite when he was abandoned as a puppy in a foreclosed home. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




A Yorkshire Terrier named Hope shows off her uni-wheel attached to a doggie vest in Longmont, Colorado April 21, 2013. Hope is missing one limb and is able to walk with the wheel attachment. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




A keeper holds an artificial tail fluke attached to female bottlenose dolphin “Fuji”, estimated to be 37-years-old, at Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Motobu town on the southern Japanese island of Okinawa February 14, 2007. Fuji lost 75 percent of her tail fluke due to an unknown disease in 2002. The dolphin can swim and jump using the artificial tail fluke, which is believed to be the world's first artificial fin for a dolphin, and was developed by veterinarians and Japan's largest tire maker Bridgestone Co., an aquarium official said. (Photo by Issei Kato/Reuters)



Martin Kaufmann, owner and founder of OrthoPets, looks over a former stray dog named Snow who had to have a right foot amputated to prepare for her artificial leg and foot in Denver February 20, 2013. OrthoPets creates prosthetics for animals. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)



Hoppa, a four-year-old mixed breed dog born without front legs, uses a prosthetic device to walk outside in the central Israeli city of Tel Aviv February 28, 2010. The device was invented especially for Hoppa by a animal-loving art student, who hopes his wheeling device will improve the lives of pets born with abnormalities or with amputated limbs. (Photo by Amir Cohen/Reuters)





A 48-year-old female elephant named Motala walks on her newly attached prosthetic leg at the Elephant Hospital in Lampang province, north of Bangkok August 16, 2009. Motala's front left leg was maimed after she stepped on a landmine at the Myanmar-Thai border 10 years ago. (Photo by Phichaiyong Mayerku/Reuters)




Tzvika, an injured female turtle, walks with the aid of her newly attached wheels at the Wildlife Hospital in the Ramat Gan Safari near Tel Aviv January 5, 2011. About two months ago, Tzvika was run over by a lawn mower and suffered severe damage to her shell, and a spinal injury that affected her ability to use her rear limbs. The wheels, attached by veterinarians at the safari, elevate the turtle to keep the shell from being worn down and enable her to walk. (Photo by Nir Elias/Reuters)

Ethiopia Valley of the Omo



Ethiopia: Valley of the Omo, Dassanetch. (Photo by Claude Gourlay)




Ethiopia: Valley of the Omo, Mursi. (Photo by Claude Gourlay)




Ethiopia: Valley of the Omo, Mursi. (Photo by Claude Gourlay)




Ethiopia: Valley of the Omo, Mursi. (Photo by Claude Gourlay)




Ethiopia: Valley of the Omo, Mursi. (Photo by Claude Gourlay)




Ethiopia: Valley of the Omo, Dassanetch. (Photo by Claude Gourlay)




Ethiopia: Valley of the Omo, Mursi; a woman with a Kalashnikov. (Photo by Claude Gourlay)




Ethiopia: Valley of the Omo, Dassanetch. (Photo by Claude Gourlay)




Ethiopia: Valley of the Omo, Mursi. (Photo by Claude Gourlay)

Car Accidents Part III



Mail truck tries to climb tree. Comm. Ave. Boston, 1927. (Photo by Leslie Jones)




Car hits lamp post, 1929. (Photo by Leslie Jones)




Car goes into trench, 1935. (Photo by Leslie Jones)




Fence keeps car from falling, Brookline, 1931. (Photo by Leslie Jones)




Car and truck collide, Back Bay, 1932. (Photo by Leslie Jones)




Southport, England. A remarkable photo, taken at the actual moment of the overturning of a racing car of Miss Mary Cunliffe, English driver, during a 100-mile race on the Southport Sands. Showing her father, who was riding with her being hurled to death. 1928. (Photo by Leslie Jones)




Bus goes sideways on icy road, circa 1930. (Photo by Leslie Jones)




Wreck draws crowd, 1935. (Photo by Leslie Jones)




Auto wrapped around tree, 1933. (Photo by Leslie Jones)

Crime Tattoo Part 2



Tattoos are commonly used among criminals to show gang membership and record the wearer's personal history—such as his or her skills, specialties, accomplishments and convictions. They are also used as a means of personal expression. Certain designs have developed recognized coded meanings. The code systems can be quite complex and because of the nature of what they encode, the tattoo designs are not widely recognized.