Hanging Temple (xuan zhong si) - China

 The Hanging Temple is one of the main tourist attractions and historical sites in the Datong area. Built more than 1400 years ago, in 491, has survived more than 1400 years. The extant monastery was largely rebuilt and maintained in the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). This temple is unique not only for its location on a sheer precipice but also because it includes Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian elements....



It was built during the late Northern Wei Dynasty (386-534AD) and is situated close to the foot of Hengshan. The buildings were restored in 1900 and there are 40 wooden halls and structures linked by an ingenious system of pillars, posts and walkways.



Hengshan is a sacred Daoist mountain reaching a height of 2,020 meters (6,625ft) located to the south of Datong. The Hanging Temple is one of the most dramatic sights at Hengshan - a wooden temple clinging to the cliff side, appearing to defy gravity with only a few wooden posts as support.
How could a building like this withstand the winds and storms of so many years? Hanging Monastery is an architectural wonder. A unique mechanical theory was applied to building the framework. Crossbeams were half-inserted into the rock as the foundation, while the rock in back became its support. Seen from below, Hanging Monastery appears to be a tumble-down castle in the air. Inside, Hanging Monastery provides the same scene as other temples.







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